Questions on Water Kefir Grains

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  • From Jill G at 12/28/10 1:02 PM
    • What kind of bacteria will my finished kefir contain after using your water kefir grains?
    • We do not test individual batches of water kefir grains for yeast and bacteria content, therefore we cannot make any guarantees to the exact probiotic makeup any particular set of water kefir grains sold on our website. However, the following link contains a list of the major species of active bacteria and yeasts that are generally found in water kefir:

      http://www.culturesforhealth.com/water-kefir-grains-composition-bacteria-yeast/

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  • From wendy at 1/23/11 9:29 PM
    • Hi-
      My son has multiple food allergies. Are these processed with nuts, eggs, milk or casein?
      Thank you
    • Our water kefir grains are processed without any nuts, eggs, milk, or casein, However, we are required to inform our customers that they are processed in a facility that may also be used to process nuts, eggs, milk, soy, or casein.

      We believe our water kefir is very clean and pure, but if you have severe allergies to any of these products, you may wish to purchase from another source.
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  • From Kika at 2/17/11 3:59 PM
    • Do I need to purchase special grains for water kefir or can my milk kefir grains adapt to use for water kefir?
    • It is possible to convert milk kefir grains to survive in and culture water, but they will not produce exactly the same result as true water kefir grains. Water grains can not be converted to milk kefir grains, however.
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  • From Shirley at 2/23/11 7:14 AM
    • Is there more then one starter is this box? If I do not continue or lose my first batch can I start fresh without purchasing again?
      Thank you,
      Shirley
    • The packet contains enough grains to culture 1 to 2 quarts of water after rehydration. Theoretically, you can reuse these grains indefinitely. With care, they will often reproduce so you eventually have enough grains to culture more sugar water at a time, or even to give to friends.

      If you need to take a short break, you can put them in a jar of sugar water and keep them in the refrigerator for a few weeks. If you need a longer break, we have instructions on how to dry them for long-term storage:

      http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-take-a-break-from-making-kefir/
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  • From jackie at 3/2/11 5:24 PM
    • so can you use these for coconut water kefir? what is the difference in the end product when using kefir grains for (coconut) water as opposed to water grains?

      thanks!
    • Water kefir grains may be used to culture sugar water, coconut water, or fruit juice. The grains consume the sugars contained in each liquid. Most of the nutritional content of the finished product will be the same as in the original liquid. The kefir grains contribute the probiotics, which should be about the same in the finished kefir from any of the liquids.
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  • From Jill G at 4/20/11 6:24 AM
    • 3 questions:

      1) Does the facility where the grains are processed also process grains or wheat? Is it a gluten-free facility?

      2) I see your grains are vegan & not animal based. I have a ton of food sensitivities ranging from mild to severe & am wondering if you could please state what vegan foods are used to create your grains?

      3) Are these grains made from organic foods only? Are there any chemicals used in their processing (I also have chemical sensitivities which is why I ask)?

      Thank you for your help. I haved loved your water kefir in the past & would like to reintroduce into my diet again but need to make sure I am doing so safely considering my many food sensitivities / allergies.

      Jill G
    • We are required by law to state that our products are processed in a facility that may also process foods containing allergens such as wheat, dairy, shellfish, etc. However, our equipment is dedicated, and we are very meticulous about cleanliness.

      The amount of exposure to allergens would be similar to if you ate in a restaurant where those foods were also served, or if you shopped in a supermarket where those foods were also sold.

      Water kefir is made with very few ingredients and no additives. We use non-chlorinated water and organic sugar to grow the water kefir grains. The grains themselves are a simple polysaccharide with a symbiotic matrix of yeast and bacteria.
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  • From Marthe at 4/23/11 9:29 PM
    • Can I use water kefir with unsweetened coconut milk?
    • For coconut milk, you are better off using milk kefir grains. (Milk kefir grains will need to be refreshed occasionally with dairy milk.) If you want to avoid milk entirely, try water kefir grains with coconut water.
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  • From Amy at 4/26/11 12:39 PM
    • When I need to take a break from my water kefir whats the best way to store them. If it's letting them dry out is it best to rest on the counter or in a dehydrator?
      Thanks!
    • If you would like to take a break from your water kefir, you may store them in sugar water in the refrigerator for up to several weeks. If you would like a longer storage time, check this article for instructions on dehydrating the grains:

      http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-take-a-break-from-making-kefir/

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  • From kate at 5/5/11 11:58 AM
    • Is it possible to culture only a very small amount at a time, such as one pint?
    • Yes, you can culture a smaller amount. However, make sure you keep the proportions of water and sugar balanced: 1/4 cup sugar per quart, so 2 tablespoons sugar per pint. Normally, 3-4 tablespoons grains are required to culture 1-2 quarts of sugar water. You may need to reduce the volume of grains used when culturing a smaller amount.

      If you don't have enough sugar, the grains will run out of fuel and can actually stop converting sugar, resulting in a more sugary final product. If you have too many grains, you can get a yeasty, smelly buildup in the solution. (It can look like foamy yeast, or like a white waxy film.)
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  • From Karen at 5/8/11 1:11 PM
    • Will the final beverage product contain the full amount of sugar or is some of it eaten/used up in the fermentation process?
    • The sucrose is converted to glucose+fructose. The glucose is used by the kefir grains for grain-building and reproduction, and the fructose remains in the drink at about 20% of the original level. This number may vary, depending on the culturing conditions. The longer the finished kefir sits, the less sweet it will be, so some fructose is apparently converted in that process as well.
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  • From Virginia at 5/27/11 1:46 PM
    • Thank you for sending my order out so quickly! It was placed on Sunday, and arrived by Thursday, in excellent shape.

      My question is about the water to use for water kefir grains. The instruction sheet said to use spring water, or boiled tap water rather than filtered water as through a Brita filter. Is this a hard-and-fast requirement for healthy kefir grains, or only a suggestion? (My family drinks Brita-filtered water all the time, and I would much rather use that than fuss with other water sources.)
    • The problem with using Brita-filtered water is that the charcoal filter system removes the trace minerals the grains need for nourishment, and over time it will weaken or starve them.

      You can use charcoal-filtered water if you replace the minerals. You can add 1/8 tsp unrefined sea salt, or 1/2 tsp unsulphured blackstrap molasses to each quart of solution to provide additional minerals for the grains. There are other ways to do it too, but those are probably the simplest.
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  • From Dana at 5/30/11 6:33 PM
    • Can I use the water kefir grains to make Kombucha, as well, or do I need to buy Kombucha starters for that?

      What about the dairy kefir grains? Can I not use them for water kefir or Kombucha?

      Thank you!
      Dana
    • Water kefir, milk kefir, and kombucha are three completely different organisms. The difference in the bacteria strains is what produces the different products. You will need a kombucha starter to make kombucha, and you will need milk kefir grains to culture milk.
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  • From shawna at 6/8/11 7:24 PM
    • If I use orgainic cane sugar at the suggested ratios what will the caloric content be per quart of fermented kefir?
    • We are unable to say exactly what the caloric content of the finished kefir may be. About 80% of the sugar you use in kefir will be converted to glucose, which is used by the grains for nutrition and reproduction, leaving about 20% by volume of fructose. The fructose will continue to ferment and reduce.

      The exact final caloric content will depend on your specific culturing conditions.
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  • From jo at 6/11/11 11:12 AM
    • Can I use organic coconut sugar to re-hydrate my new water kefir grains?
    • Coconut sugar may be okay for rehydrating water kefir grains. It is about 80% sucrose (table sugar is 100% sucrose), and is loaded with minerals, which water kefir grains like.

      We have noticed that coconut sugar can be hard on the grains, however. For best results, rehydrate the grains in cane sugar. If you'd like to culture sugar water made with coconut sugar, keep an eye on your grains. If they begin to break up or turn mushy, please switch back to cane sugar or alternate batches with cane sugare and coconut sugar, to keep your grains healthy.

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  • From Sally at 6/23/11 4:59 PM
    • I've been looking for kosher kefir grains for quite a while. Would you happen to know if this is kosher?
    • They are not CERTIFIED kosher. However, they are made using nothing but spring water and organic cane sugar. The equipment used to make them is not used for anything else.
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  • From Sally at 6/23/11 5:52 PM
    • Thanks for answering my question so quickly. Can I use these water kefir grains to make milk kefir?

      Thank You!
    • Sorry, milk kefir and water kefir are entirely different organisms. Milk kefir grains can sometimes be converted to work with water, but can't be converted back, and you can't convert water grains to work with milk.
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  • From Jennifer at 6/26/11 2:32 PM
    • Can I use honey or agave nectar instead of sugar?
    • Honey is not a good choice for water kefir, as it has antibacterial properties and may weaken or kill the grains. Agave nectar is primarily fructose, and you may get a good fermentation from it, but the grains need glucose to grow and reproduce. Cane sugar tends to give the best results for water kefir. The sucrose of the cane sugar is converted to glucose (used for growth and reproduction) and fructose (which will continue fermenting and produce carbon dioxide).
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  • From paula at 7/7/11 10:36 PM
    • I've had great success with my water kefir, but lately I've noticed a lot of sediment or floating strands especially in the second fermentation step. What is that?!
    • That sounds like yeasty growths, and may be a result of your grains wanting more minerals. Try adding 1/4 teaspoon unrefined sea salt to each quart of sugar water and see if that helps.
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  • From Jan at 7/7/11 2:03 PM
    • What water works best with the water kefir? I have reverse osmosis and I heard there isn't enough mineral in the water. I am afraid to use tap water!
    • It's true that RO water is too clean for water kefir!

      Actually, tap water is usually best, unless it contains chlorine or fluoride. Chlorine can be removed by boiling or aeration; chloramine (a chlorine alternative) needs to be charcoal-filtered. Fluoride is a litte trickier, and requires special filters.

      If you have to use ultra-pure water, you can add in minerals with 1/8 teaspoon unrefined sea salt per quart of water, or 1/4 teaspoon baking soda, or 1/2 teaspoon unsulphured blackstrap molasses. Some people add oyster shell, or clean eggshell.
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  • From jon at 7/14/11 8:01 AM
    • regarding kosher kefir grains - you state

      'They are not CERTIFIED kosher. However, they are made using nothing but spring water and organic cane sugar. The equipment used to make them is not used for anything else.'

      this would be fine - however - do they somehow originate from a sheep stomach or something lovely like that - if so - how remote was that?
    • No, there are no animals involved in any part of water kefir production. The grains themselves are a collection of bacteria and yeast, making up a complex polysaccharide. There is very little known about the true origin of the organism, but some evidence points to its original discovery in cactus plants.
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  • From Nancy at 7/23/11 7:38 PM
    • Thanks for all the great info. I have Candida, and am getting ready to tackle it. My question is about the 20% sugar that is left behind. I keep reading that kefir is good for Candida, but what about the sugar? These 2 things don't seem to go together to me. I really want to make my own water kefir, but need to be sure that I'm not feeding the Candida.
    • We can't make any health claims for our products, or give you any medical advice. Many people with candida issue do report being able to drink water kefir without difficulty. If you have medical concerns, you should consult with your health care professional.
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  • From Laura at 10/4/11 9:59 AM
    • I see that a number of people have asked about the possible presence of allergens in your kefir grains. Thank you for your thoughtful replies! My particular allergen-of-concern is latex, aka rubber or natural rubber. Are your kefir grains handled with or do they come into contact with latex?
      Thanks.
    • No latex, rubber, or natural rubber comes in contact with the grains. They are handled only with utensils, not by hand.
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  • From crystal at 10/4/11 11:37 AM
    • When I receive the water kefier grains, how many batches will I have to waste before I can drink the coconut water kefir? Also, can I continously use the water kefir grains to make coconut water kefir only? I heard that the grains will become mushy or die if you do that?
    • I suggest using sugar water for rehydration, as the glucose is essential for the grains. This way you won't be throwing out coconut water. Coconut water is mostly fructose, and will ferment beautifully, but it doesn't nourish the grains.​ I would do a sugar water ferment every so often to give the grains the nourishment they need. Hope that helps!
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  • From BN at 10/19/11 1:00 PM
    • Is it possible to successfully make water kefir withOUT sugar.

      I must eat low-GI foods due to sugar imbalance issues in my body, and generally use agave to sweeten.

      Can water kefir be made withOUT sugar?

      Thanks!
    • No, water kefir cannot be made without sugar. Sugar is what the grains use to survive, and to ferment. Without sugar the grains will starve, and there will be nothing to ferment, so no bacterial reproduction will take place. The sucrose that cane sugar provides is converted by the grains into glucose and fructose. The glucose is used by the grains to grow and reproduce, and the fructose is fermented into carbon dioxide. After a 48-hour fermentation, the amount of fructose remaining in the kefir is about 20% of the amount of sucrose that was originally present. After a second ferment of 3 to 5 days, there is virtually no sugar at all left in the solution. Some types of alternative sugars can be used for fermentation (such as agave or fruit juice, for instance, both of which are primarily fructose), but if there is no glucose present, the grains will not be nourished and will quickly die off.
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  • From Julianna at 10/21/11 2:33 PM
    • I purchased some water kefir grains from your site. I notice on the package that it says "heirloom variety" and on the website, it says "heirloom-style" -- can you explain what you mean by heirloom? Or heirloom-style? Thanks
    • On our website, "heirloom" means we've been growing them ourselves onsite, for several years, and also that they are re-usable and will propagate from one batch to the next. It is in contrast to "direct-set" which is something you can use once, and possibly propagate a few times, but ultimately you will need another infusion of direct-set culture.​
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  • From Annie at 10/29/11 11:05 PM
    • Can I drink the sugar water I used to rehydrate the grains upon receiving them? Tomorrow will be 4 days so I need to start them in fresh sugar water but wonder if I can drink the liquid they've been sitting in while they've been rehydrating.
    • You can but we don't recommend it. Since the kefir grains spent their time rehydrating rather than consuming the sugar, the resulting solution will likely contain a large amount of sugar. Also, the sugar water may taste unplesant as part of the rehydration process is the rebalancing of the yeast and bacteria that comprise the kefir grains.
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  • From Kaiti Tate at 11/2/11 11:24 AM
    • I have a charcoal filter with a fluoride attachment and I read you aren't supposed to use charcoal filtered water but to use tap water to boil out the chlorine but it will not get rid of the fluoride. I also read on your site you can add unrefined sea salt or molasses to your filtered water to add back the minerals. So I was wondering if I use rapadura to sweeten would I need to add salt or molasses since I would be using whole sugar with the molasses in it? Thank you
    • Thanks so much for contacting us! Rapadura is good for kefir, but not everyone likes the strong flavor, so keep that in mind. With the filtering, the water is going to be pretty pure. You might need some extra minerals in addition. A little sea salt should take care of that. Just add a pinch.
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  • From Cat at 11/8/11 3:59 PM
    • What is the difference in the dehydrated water kefir grains and the ones that are not dehydrated? Does one work better than the other? Why chose dehydrated?
    • The difference between the two is that the dehydrated are more easily shipped in the mail. Once you receive them, you re-hydrate them and they become regular non- dehydrated kefir grains!
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  • From Alkaline at 11/16/11 2:31 PM
    • How much kefir water should one consume each day? Is there a minimum or maximum amount?
    • There is no set amount. Some people prefer to drink just a little, while others are happy with 2 or more quarts. If you have health concerns regarding the amount of kefir water you can consume, you should check with your health care professional.
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  • From Cristal at 11/18/11 1:48 PM
    • I have done about 3 batches of water kefir and as far as I know it is going great! My question is when my kefir is done fermenting there are bubbles, seems like more grains all held together with a kind slime. Is this normal? I know the bubbles are ok, I just wasn't sure about the kind of slime. I wouldn't say it is mucousy looking, but more of a brownish color.
    • Extra "slime" can be caused by a mineral or nutrient deficiency. If your water is short on minerals, the grains can go out of balance. Try using a less-refined sugar, or adding minerals to the water with unrefined sea salt, or baking powder. Another way to reduce slime is to add a slice of lemon (including the peel) to the water.
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  • From Sherri at 11/21/11 11:15 AM
    • I choose to abstain from alcohol for religious reasons. Since this is a sugar fermentation product I assume alcohol is being produced. Do you have an estimate of how much alcohol would be present in the finished product?
    • Depending on the fermentation process, fermentation temperature, time and type of culture used, the alcohol content of Kefir (and other fermented beverages) will vary from 0.5%, up to a maximum of 3% alcohol. The average alcohol content in home brewing is around 0.5% with a loose lid up to a max of 1% in an airtight jar. Using a cloth or paper covering reduces the alcohol amount.
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  • From John at 11/23/11 9:36 PM
    • I am concerned about fructose. Can a pure glucose sweetener be used (such as corn syrup before it's been processed into high fructose corn syrup), instead of sugar? If so, would the same quantity be required?
    • Sucrose is made up of two sugars: glucose and fructose. The water kefir grains break down the sucrose and use the glucose for grain nourishment and growth, and the fructose to feed the bacteria and yeast in the fermentation process.

      A straight glucose will feed the grains, but not the bacteria and yeast IN the grains, and there will be little or no fermentation.

      Once fermentation has begun, the fructose is reduced continually until there is none left. Water kefir that has fermented for 24 hours with the grains, then another few days without the grains will have virtually no sugar in it at all (and will be extremely tart, like lemon juice or vinegar).
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  • From Laura at 11/27/11 7:40 PM
    • Hello,
      I just purchased the water kefir grains from you and I am rehydrating them. My concern is that there appears to be brown/black yeast on the grains. I noticed this on the dried grains before putting them into the sugar solution, but now 24 hours later, it is very obvious that there is something on the grains/in the culture. I am very familar with kefir grains, since I have milk kefir grains, so I know that this is not normally present on the grains. I have seen no pictures showing this brown/black growth online. All the pictures of water kefir grains show what looks to be clearish and/or uniform light brown color from the molassas in the sugar. Mine definatelly have some yeast or something in the culture. Is this a bad batch? What can be done?
      Laura
    • The brown/black specks you describe are not at all uncommon, and are most likely impurities (minerals) from the very unrefined sugar we use to grow water kefir. You can usually pick them out with a toothpick from the rehydrated grains, and unless you are also using an unrefined sugar, they won't come back. The little mineral particles tend to stick in the crevices of the water kefir grains but can be removed easily.
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  • From MARIA at 12/22/11 4:06 PM
    • MY KEFIRE TASTE SOUR ARE THEY SUPPOSE TO BE SOUR
    • Kefir can have a sour or tart taste, depending upon the length of time you let it culture. If it's too sour for your taste, cut back on culturing time a bit.
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  • From MARIA at 12/22/11 4:09 PM
    • CAN KEFIR GO BAD?
    • Kefir will continue to ferment and the taste will get stronger, the longer you let it ferment. If you suspect a problem with your kefir, please contact us at customersupport@culturesforhealth.com.
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  • From Dana at 12/28/11 12:00 PM
    • I ordered from this site water grains 2 weeks ago.Yesterday, after 48 hours of culture water was white
      (like milk) and smelled like yeast. I trow away that kefir and put another 2 quart of water and 1/2 cup of organic sugar. Did I do right thing? Thanks.
    • Yes, you did the right thing. With the next batch, check it after 24 hours, as it sounds like the first batch was kefired a bit too long. If you have problems with your kefir grains, please contact customer support.
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  • From glory at 1/27/12 6:45 AM
    • How do I tell if the water kefir grains have gone bad ( i used a Stainless steel strainer once). I just cultured them and they worked fine and i see healthy ones on the bottom but on the top, there is a kind of pink powdery substance???

      Thanks,
      G
    • It sounds like your grains would benefit from a rinse, rest and recover. You will find the instructions here http://www.culturesforhealth.com/rehabilitating-fixing-repairing-damaged-water-kefir-grains A stainless steel strainer wouldn't have damaged your grains but there may be something else going on. Please try the instructions for rehabilitating your grains and contact customersupport@culturesforhealth.com if you have further problems.
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  • From glory at 1/29/12 5:06 PM
    • Hello,

      Will using a stainless steel spoon and strainer damage my water kefir or is that as good as plastic?


      Thank you,
      Glory
    • We advise using wooden or plastic utensils because often "stainless steel" utensils also include other metals. Brief contact with pure stainless steel utensils will usually not harm the grains, but other metals can react with the acids in the grains and damage them.
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  • From Denise Donoso at 2/5/12 11:57 AM
    • When I use my water kefir grains to create a drink, can I reuse them or do I have to throw them away?
      Thanks,
      Denise
    • Water Kefir Grains can be re-used over and over again to make water kefir. The more you use them, the more productive they will be. They will eventually grow and multiply so you can make more kefir at once, or share them with friends.
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  • From Nicole at 2/7/12 1:43 AM
    • I bought the kefir a while back and never used it. How long is it good for? The little bag is comes in was never opened.
    • In the unopened package at room temperature 4 - 6 weeks, in the refrigerator 12 months. Freezing dehydrated grains in not recommended. I'm hoping you had them in the fridge : )
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  • From Joanne at 2/15/12 7:31 PM
    • My water grains will not grow. I use RO water and 1/4 cup sugar in quart jar. I would like to be able to make a 1/2 gallon at a time. Should I rinse the grains between batches? Thanks.
    • Rinsing grains between batches is not necessary. Review the article here on ways to encourage your grains to multiply.

      http://www.culturesforhealth.com/encouraging-water-kefir-grains-to-multiply

      If you have further questions, please contact customer support for troubleshooting help and advice.
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  • From Karl at 2/17/12 7:03 PM
    • I strain out the finished product through a plastic sprouting lid. The grains left in the bottle look a bit messy and murky. Is it alright to pour in a little fresh H2o and rinse the grains by pouring out through the strainer, or will this diminish their potency or have any other negative effect?
    • There is normally no reason to rinse grains between batches. If your grains look murky and messy, they might benefit from a rinse, rest, and recovery. Instructions can be found here: http://www.culturesforhealth.com/rehabilitating-fixing-repairing-damaged-water-kefir-grains
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  • From Eva at 2/18/12 8:31 PM
    • We have several lactose intolerant people in our house and a casein intolerant person so I was thinking of using the water kefir grains (since the milk kefir has powder milk in it) to make kefir with rice milk or almond milk. Does that work? If not, what can I do to make kefir without dairy in the grains?
    • Yes... you can put about 1/4 cup of water Kefir in 2.5 to 3 cups of "milk" then let it sit for 12 to 24 hours to make a tasty cultured drink.
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  • From Traci at 2/20/12 12:10 PM
    • Can you use stevia in the fermentation or in the finished product to sweeten it.
    • I'm sorry but no, you cannot use stevia for culturing water kefir. The grains feed off of sugar as their food source. Without the sugar, the grains would starve and die.

      You may sweeten the finished kefir with Stevia if you prefer, once the grains have been removed.
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  • From Michelle at 2/22/12 2:32 PM
    • Do you ever have to refrigerate the kefir water after it is made?
    • Yes, it is best to refrigerate it or it will continue to ferment.
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  • From Peggy at 2/23/12 10:31 AM
    • Once I ferment the grains, pour the water kefir using the plastic strainer into another jar, can I reuse the same jar I took the grains out of to refurment or do I need to use a new clean jar?
    • You need to start with a clean jar. It also helps to triple rinse the jar, Kefir grains are not fond of soap :)
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  • From Craig at 2/24/12 10:46 PM
    • We have noticed a yeasty smell with the buildup as described in the answer to one of the questions. Are the grains wrecked, or should we just use less grains in our solution(s)?
    • Your grains are fine but they could probably use a little rehab. You will find the instructions here: http://www.culturesforhealth.com/rehabilitating-fixing-repairing-damaged-water-kefir-grains

      There are a few things that can cause a yeasty smell. If you are culturing any other foods or beverages, cross contamination could be an issue or it could simply be that you're over culturing your kefir. We recommend not leaving your grains in the sugar-water more than 48 hours or they may run out of food.

      All of our kefir articles (and lots of recipes) can be found here: http://www.culturesforhealth.com/kefir
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  • From Nivien at 2/24/12 4:26 PM
    • How many calories does 1 liter of water kefir (without added flavors) contain?
    • We are unable to say exactly what the caloric content of the finished kefir may be. About 80% of the sugar you use in kefir will be converted to glucose, which is used by the grains for nutrition and reproduction, leaving about 20% by volume of fructose. The fructose will continue to ferment and reduce.

      The exact final caloric content will depend on your specific culturing conditions.
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  • From Nivien at 2/24/12 4:54 PM
    • This is a follow up to the question I just asked and the answer I received:

      How many calories are contained in a quart of water that contains 1.4% fructose?
    • Again, we are unable to say exactly what the caloric content of the finished kefir may be without lab testing. The exact final caloric content will depend on your specific culturing conditions.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Robin at 3/2/12 12:32 AM
    • I have brown strands floating around with the kefir grains. I sometimes remove them manually, but they return slowly over a few weeks. Is it yeast? What should I do?
    • More than likely it is yeast combined with particles from the sugar or molasses (especially if you're using a raw, natural sugar). It sounds like your grains would probably benefit from grain rehab. You will find the instructions here: http://www.culturesforhealth.com/rehabilitating-fixing-repairing-damaged-water-kefir-grains If you have any problems, please send an e-mail to customersupport@culturesforhealth.com
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No

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