Matsoni Yogurt Starter

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$12.99

Matsoni Yogurt Starter

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Matsoni yogurt starter (a.k.a. Caspian Sea yogurt) contains live active bacteria and cultures at room temperature on the counter: no yogurt maker required! One packet of yogurt starter can be used to make unlimited amounts of homemade yogurt as it can be serial cultured: a small amount of yogurt from each batch is reserved to inoculate the next batch of homemade yogurt. With care, this yogurt culture can be used to make homemade yogurt indefinitely. No more having to continually buy yogurt starter!

  • Moderately-thick yogurt
  • Tart yogurt taste
  • Cultures at 70° to 78°F, no yogurt maker required
  • Reusable culture; with care a little from each batch is used to make the next batch


Originating in The Republic of Georgia, matsoni yogurt (pronounced madzoon or matsohnee) is also known in Japan as Caspian Sea yogurt. A slightly tart yogurt, matsoni is excellent sweetened with a bit of honey or served over fruit. Matsoni yogurt has a thick viscous consistency.

Click here to compare our different yogurt varieties



How to Make Matsoni Yogurt: As a mesophilic culture, this yogurt starter cultures at room temperature. To make a batch of homemade yogurt, simply add the yogurt culture to milk, stir, then allow the yogurt to culture on the counter before placing in the refrigerator. The yogurt starter can be serial cultured: a small amount of homemade yogurt from each batch is reserved to inoculate the next batch of homemade yogurt. With care, our matsoni yogurt culture can be used to make homemade yogurt indefinitely.

Customers wishing to use raw milk to make homemade yogurt will need to take additional steps to ensure a pure starter is maintained. Additional instructions for making raw milk yogurt may be found here.

Full instructions for making matsoni yogurt can be found here and will be included with your order.

Using alternative milks: Matsoni yogurt starter may be used with alternative milks (soy, coconut, etc.) but is unlikely to reculture beyond the first few generations. Therefore we strongly recommend keeping a backup dairy-based culture on hand for making yogurt with alternative milks. Matsoni yogurt starter can be used with goat milk, although due to the nature of goat milk the resulting yogurt may be significantly less thick than yogurt made with whole cow milk. We do not recommend using UHT (aka ultra-pasteurized) milk when working with any starter culture.

Ingredients: Organic milk, lactic bacteria (Lactobacillis lactis subsp. cremoris and Acetobacter orientalis).

Produced or packaged in a facility that also manufactures products made with wheat, dairy, soy, eggs, nuts, and fish.  

Due to recent changes in manufacturing processes, the weight of the item which appears in the photo will differ from the actual weight of the item received.

Shipping Information: Our Matsoni yogurt starter is shipped in a barrier-sealed packet as a freeze-dried yogurt culture in a dairy carrier. Please keep it in a cool dry place until you are ready to make your first batch of homemade yogurt. We ship enough yogurt culture to make two batches of yogurt starter. We recommend that you reserve the second packet in the refrigerator or freezer to use as a back-up.  

Detailed culturing instructions will be included with your order and can also be found here.

 

       


Suzanne

 

Why I Love This Product

Eating matsoni yogurt brings back wonderful memories of visits from Grandma. My Armenian grandmother used to make yogurt for us kids, long before plain yogurt was available in our small-town grocery store. The tart flavor with just a little honey added makes a wonderful treat!
Suzanne, Customer Support Representative

 

 



Questions on Matsoni Yogurt Starter

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  • From jenella at 2/5/14 11:59 PM
    • Could I use pastured cream with the matsoni starter? (I see every available milk style but that one!)
    • Yes, pastured cream would be great for use with the Matsoni starter. If it is not pasteurized or has a very high cream content, you will want to maintain a "mother" culture on pasteurized milk for the health of the culture.
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  • From Rachel at 10/15/13 11:20 AM
    • I purchased this yogurt to use with raw milk. I understand the concept of maintaing a pure starter, but can I make a smaller amount of it? Perhaps just 1 cup of pure starter instead of 1 quart? I'd rather not pastuerize such large amounts of raw milk.
    • Yes, you can make a smaller mother culture with pasteurized milk,1 to 2 cups will work fine.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From anon at 9/19/13 9:42 PM
    • Can I strain this yogurt to make a thicker greek style yogurt?
    • Yes, you can strain this yogurt to make Greek-style yogurt.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Cc lee at 9/28/12 7:18 PM
    • Do I have to wait until the temperature of the milk is 70-77 befor adding the cultur starter?
    • If you're bringing the milk out of the refrigerator, you do not have to let the milk come to room temperature before adding the starter culture.

      If you are making a batch of mother culture for using raw milk, and the milk has been heated, you should let the milk cool to 70-77ºF before adding the starter culture.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From CC Lee at 9/21/12 6:42 PM
    • I bought Matsoni yogurt starter that will culture under room temperature. However, I have a yogurt maker machine. Can I still use the machine to make my yogurt for this particular type of starter?
      Thanks,
    • Matsoni cultures at room temperature and requires a temperature between 70° and 77°. Yogurt makers are designed to maintain a temperature of 110°, much too hot for a Matsoni yogurt culture.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Bryan at 7/10/12 3:36 PM
    • When I am activating the culture, should I expect to see some separation? It looks like I have a lump of yogurt surrounded by a little bit of liquid. I am using skim milk. I put it in the fridge now.
    • When culturing yogurt, there is often a layer of whey on the top. If the amount of whey is significant, that is a sign of overculturing. Watch your culturing time with your next batch, making sure to stop the culturing by placing the yogurt in the refrigerator as soon as it's set. Keep in mind that with low fat milks, you will get a thinner product than with whole milk.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Dawn at 4/20/12 12:30 PM
    • Is properly cultured Matsoni SCD- or GAPS-legal? In order to be SCD-legal, for instance, the culture must eventually eat up all the lactose in the milk. Will this happen if I culture it for 48 hours?
    • To achieve an extra-tart yogurt with all the lactose consumed, you would let it culture longer, until the curds begin to separate out from the whey. When "over-culturing" yogurt this way, you must be careful to not let the culture starve. If the bacteria are too long without lactose, they will starve and die, and you won't be able to make a new set of yogurt.

      If you want to remove all the lactose AND re-culture the yogurt from batch to batch, you might want to consider making a mother culture, that cultures for a shorter amount of time and that you can then use to make the lactose-free batches.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From michelle at 3/25/12 11:21 PM
    • what kind of milk do you recommend? organic milk at the store or raw milk? it is hard to find raw from where I live.
    • Any type of milk will work well with this starter, except for ultra-pasteurized or reconstituted dry milk, both of which are highly processed and may give unreliable results. Organic whole pasteurized milk is a good choice.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Stephanie at 2/28/12 11:58 AM
    • Can I use this culture for non-dairy milks? I'd like a culture I could re-use, unlike the vegan culture.
    • You may be able to culture a batch of non-dairy milk with this starter, but it will not perpetuate, as the cultures need lactose and milk protein to replicate.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Karen at 2/1/12 7:16 AM
    • I would like to make raw yogurt using this starter culture. After looking at the directions, it sounds as if I would have to keep purchasing starter cultures, as I can't use raw yogurt to culture future batches. I would run out of the mother culture at some point, right?

      Thank you for the clarification...
    • No, you just need to maintain a separate mother culture that has been prepared with heated milk. You would need to make a new mother culture within 7 days to maintain viability of the culture. You will find more information about maintaining a mesphilic culture with raw milk here: http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-make-yogurt
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No

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Customer Reviews

Great yogurt Review by Haley
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This is the second yogurt culture I have purchased from Cultures for Health and I love it. This seems to take about 13 hours to culture in my house but it is very tasty and great for breakfast. (Posted on March 25, 2014)
Arrived quickly and tastes great Review by Jenn
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Value
Arrived quickly and tastes great! (Posted on February 13, 2014)
Didnt work Review by David
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Followed all the directions and it just wouldnt come out. Didnt know what I was doing wrong or why it didnt turn out.

Response from CFH: Please contact customer support for troubleshooting advice before discarding product. Many cultures can be saved with minor adjustments. (Posted on January 31, 2014)
Disappointed Review by Sara
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Based on the other reviews, I purchased this yogurt expecting an easy, tangy, delicious yogurt. That is not what this is. I used whole organic milk (pasteurized, but not ultra-pasteurized) and cultured it twice.

It didn't make the thick yogurt that I was expecting. It was more like really runny jello. The flavor wasn't tangy, it was bland and nonexistent. The only way I could eat it was to add it to a smoothie. I have much better results with culturing my yogurt in a crockpot from a store bought starter.

Skip this one.

Note from CFH: Culturing temperature is important when culturing countertop yogurts; maintain 70-77ºF for best results. Please contact customer support for troubleshooting assistance and advice on keeping your cultures warm during winter months. (Posted on January 7, 2014)
Great culture Review by Loops
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Awesome culture, thick and very tasty! Give it a whirl! (Posted on December 21, 2013)
disappointed Review by yogurt make
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This was priced really high compared to other yogurt starters, but I was willing to pay because I wanted this particular strand. It came in only TWO small packs (others usually have 5 under $7) and both of them failed to make yogurt, even though I followed the instruction to the T. So I wasted almost $20. I can't recommend this product to anybody.

Response from CFH: Please contact customer support for troubleshooting advice before discarding product. Many cultures can be saved with minor adjustments. (Posted on December 8, 2013)
Easy and delicious. Review by Chris R
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This yogurt is mildly tart and very easy to make. I split some of my first batch and took it with me on a plane. While on vacation I successfully made several batches from just a tablespoon of mature yogurt! This was a great solution because I didn't have access to a system for heating yogurt to 110°, so this culture produced great tasting yogurt by sitting in a jar at room temperature .

I have had better texture when using grass fed non-homogenized whole milk. And even better luck when heating the milk to 180° then cooling to 70° before adding my mature yogurt. That isn't absolutely necessary, though. (Posted on April 14, 2013)
Great taste, great value Review by Anna
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I was looking for a yogurt that required no heating of milk or long incubation period, and when I saw this and remembered the taste of some Georgian yogurt I had a long time ago I thought to give it a try. I was a bit nervous because the first batch took a long time to culture (almost 48 hours), but when it finally set, it was a lovely, mild and soft yogurt, just as I remembered it. It's thinner and runnier than storebought yogurts, but has a very, very fresh and smooth taste--like one of the previous reviewers says, it's actually better on its own that with anything added. It recultures fast--second and subsequent batches only took 12 hours in a 70 degree room (I have a drafty kitchen so yogurt sits on a bookshelf in the living room). I use full-fat milk, mostly organic, but it works like a charm with plain non-rGB milk as well. Definitely recommending as it's a ton easier than any other method. (Posted on April 7, 2013)
Fabulous Yogurt Review by Sherry, from Avalon Naturals
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This was my first attempt at making my own yogurt and I am HOOKED. The Matsoni is very easy to maintain. In a warm, sunny room, it took about 12 hours to culture. It has a nice twangy flavor to it & though I tried adding some flavors, I preferred the natural taste. It's somewhat thinner than I expected, but I had to remind myself of what store-bought yogurts contained. It's much thicker than kefir, but I still like to put it in a glass and drink it rather than sitting down with a bowl & spoon. (Posted on February 8, 2013)
Wow Review by Antoinette
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I ordered this one by mistake... and I sure am glad I did... This yogurt is so mild tasting and I love the consistency. Also I've noticed that right after I drink it, I feel great! Thank you so much for this lovely product!!! (Posted on January 24, 2013)
Love this yogurt Review by Alexandra
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I made my first matsoni using yogurt made by a friend's mom in Japan. When that strain died due to an unfortunate kitchen accident, I got the matsoni starter from Cultures for Health, and have had great results. It makes a somewhat thin, but creamy tasting yogurt. Delicious on cereal or granola, with honey or jam, or just plain. It's especially delightful when made from half-and-half. (Posted on March 15, 2012)
BignJames@frontier.com Review by BignJames
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Great yogurt....good consistency and flavor. Make sure milk is at room temp. before adding starter. (Posted on December 15, 2011)
I highly recommend Matsoni Review by experimental cook
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The Matsoni starter was very easy to get going and is easy to maintain. I use raw Jersey milk to make my yogurt and it's rich and delicious. My favorite way to use the Matsoni is making frozen yogurt with fresh strawberries or peaches and palm sugar or raw honeyfor sweetener. Yum!!! My family has definitely given it a thumbs up :-) (Posted on August 5, 2011)
Love this stuff! Review by kitchen wrecker
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Matsoni Yogurt is easy and delicious. My starter took 36 hours to set and I culture the yogurt using raw milk or 2% pasteurized and homogenized for 12 hours. The results are consistent with each batch and milk type. It does set up the same between batches and milk types. I do not find it to be tart at all,it is the mildest tasting cultured milk product I've ever had. Much easier than making yogurt in a yoogurt maker, even easier than kefir. (Posted on April 13, 2011)
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