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Bulgarian Yogurt Starter

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$12.99


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Bulgarian Yogurt Starter

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Our Bulgarian Yogurt Starter Culture is the creamiest of the thermophilic heirloom yogurts. It can be re-cultured indefinitely. Thick, rich, and mild, this is the closest to commercial “European Style” yogurt. 

  • Each box contains 2 packets of yogurt starter
  • Activate 1 packet using 1 quart pasteurized milk; store 2nd packet in the freezer as a back-up
  • Cultures at 110ºF using a yogurt maker or other appliance
  • This culture is also suitable for use with raw dairy milk or non-dairy milk, with special care.
  • The mild flavor of Bulgarian Yogurt makes it a great base for dips, dressings, or other recipes using yogurt.  


Bulgarian Yogurt Starter Instructions and Troubleshooting: 


Ingredients: Organic milk, live active bacteria (L. BulgaricusS. Thermophilus).

This product contains no GMO ingredients.


Shipping Information and Shelf-life: Our Bulgarian starter culture is shipped in a barrier-sealed packet as a freeze-dried yogurt culture. The starter keeps 

  • At room temperature (68° to 78°F): 3 to 4 months
  • In the refrigerator (40° to 45°F): 9 months unopened
  • In the freezer (0° to 25°F): 12 months unopened

 

Allergen Information:

Manufactured in a facility that also produces products made with gluten and dairy.


Actual product may differ from image shown above.


Questions on Bulgarian Yogurt Starter

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  • From navywifearmymom at 5/18/2012 1:24 PM
    • In the directions for the Bulgarian Yogurt starter, what is the purpose for letting the yogurt sit out of for 2 hours after incubation before putting it in the refrigerator? I am currently using the Traditional Yogurt starter. Those directions don't say that, and I have normally just taken the containers out of the maker and put them directly in the refrigerator.

      THANKS
    • The cooling down period is safer for the bacteria, as sudden temperature changes will damage it.
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  • From Milena at 5/28/2012 12:55 PM
    • Another comment/suggestion.

      It has been mentioned in some of the comments that people add a bit of non-fat dry powdered milk to thicken their yogurt. This works really well for thickening yogurt made out of fat free milk. I usually add 1-1.5 cups dry powdered milk per 2L of fat free milk (that's roughly 0.5 gallon of milk). It comes out perfect: no need to strain, wash more utensils, etc. In fact, my yogurt ends up so think you can literally empty the container onto a plate, turning it upside down, and it will keep its shape like a custard desert. By the way, you can do great looking deserts that way, adding berries, nuts, drizzling honey on top, etc.)
    • Thank you for sharing your successful tip!
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Betsy at 6/26/2012 3:24 PM
    • Just curious as to why you should not use ultra pastuerized milk?
    • Ultra-pasteurized milk is processed at higher temperatures and pressures than pasteurized milk, and is often too sterile for the yogurt culture to take hold. Additionally, the milk proteins may not coagulate as well due to the extra processing.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Sean at 7/21/2012 4:24 AM
    • Adding to the question about the difference between the Bulgarian and greek yogurts, I was wondering how the different ratios are maintained through the ongoing batches. It would seem that the ratios of the two would drift during the indefinite reculturings.
    • We culture different products at different times to avoid any cross contamination, as well as maintaining sterile conditions.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Cathy at 8/13/2012 4:27 PM
    • How many "packets" of yogurt starter are in one box?
    • Each box contains 2 packets of yogurt starter. Reserve the second packet in your fridge until you are certain your first batch of yogurt has cultured properly. Keep the second packet in the freezer as a back-up in case your original culture needs to be replaced or if you wish to take an extended break from yogurt making.

      One packet of yogurt culture can be used to make unlimited amounts of homemade yogurt as it can be re-cultured by reserving a small amount of yogurt from the current batch to inoculate the next batch of homemade yogurt. With care, this yogurt culture can be used to make homemade yogurt indefinitely.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Spencer at 9/2/2012 4:10 PM
    • My Bulgarian Yogurt Starter hasn't been refrigerated for several weeks. Think the cultures have a chance? They've been sitting at room temperature for over a month (oops).
    • The Bulgarian Yogurt Starter will normally only last 3 to 4 weeks at room temperature. If it has been in a fairly cool place, go ahead and give it a try.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Christine at 12/14/2012 1:04 PM
    • Can I freeze some of the yogurt to use as a future starter? My family is not going through it fast enough right now and I am afraid the yogurt will go bad before I make a new batch.
    • You can freeze the pasteurized dairy mother starter, but it will only stay viable for about 2-3 weeks.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Kathy at 1/21/2013 12:22 AM
    • Two questions:
      1. Following up on Sean's question regarding Bulgarian vs Greek cultures that contain the same bacteria in different ratios....If, for example, I order Bulgarian starter and perpetuate the culture, couldn't the ratio of bacterial strains in my mother culture drift over time? (The answer posted seemed to pertain to operations in your facility, not what might happen at home.)
      2. Why can't direct-set starters be perpetuated? As far as I know, bacteria will replicate indefinitely as long as the health of the culture is maintained, and proper growth media is supplied (which one is doing, presumably). So what goes wrong? Do some bacterial strains in the mixture outcompete others?
    • It is possible that the bacteria in your yogurt will change, depending on what is in the air in your home or what you have culturing nearby. However, as long as you take care when culturing, re-culture within 7 days, and keep different yogurt varieties and other fermenting foods separate, your yogurt bacteria should remain true.

      Direct-set starters contain different bacteria strains from reusable heirloom starters. The bacteria in each determine the yogurt's characteristics and whether it will re-culture indefinitely or not.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From Penelope at 4/23/2013 8:16 PM
    • Contemplating whether to make my own yogurt, but I am a little confused about one detail: how long can I keep part of the "mother batch" to continue making more yogurt? Will it spoil after 3 weeks, therefore requiring me start from scratch (a new starter kit)?

      Thank you kindly!
    • The mother batch, also known as the pasteurized dairy mother culture, is viable for culturing for about 7 days. So you need to make a pasteurized dairy new mother culture once a week. You don't need to buy more culture, you can keep reculturing what you have.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No
  • From ASH at 4/27/2013 11:55 PM
    • I'd like to know how long I can keep the mother batch in the fridge.
    • The mother culture, also known as the pasteurized dairy mother culture, will remain viable for reculturing in the refrigerator for up to one week. It should be edible for approximately a month.
    • Do you find this question helpful?  Yes   No

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Customer Reviews

Fantastic Review by DeAnna
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Love the taste of this yogurt, and love the fact it is heirloom. My kids eat it like crazy and think it tastes better then store bought! Winner all around!

(Posted on 5/4/2015)

Love this yogurt!!! Review by GardenGirl
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This is by far my favorite yogurt. Tangy, yet mild, thick and creamy. I eat it every day with honey. I do keep my milk a 170* for about 20-30 minutes to help thicken the final product...I found it was not thick enough for me without this step. Such a great company...I love all of their products!!

(Posted on 4/25/2015)

Good Cultures Review by Reed
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I had been making mine with store cultures, but I didn't like how they wore out over time. I've enjoyed the Bulgarian cultures, the thickness and taste. I've found I don't need to add anything to it to enjoy the taste. I've personally found that adding about a cup of powdered milk for 2 quarters and culturing for about 4 hours turns out a good batch.

(Posted on 4/23/2015)

Delicious, creamy & thick. Review by Sharon
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We love this yogurt! It tastes great and has a thick & creamy consistency.

(Posted on 4/18/2015)

Best tasting yogurt! Review by Esther
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I've made my first quart of Bulgarian yogurt. I love the taste - creamy and mild. I hope it makes many more quarts!

(Posted on 4/18/2015)

Delicious, only slightly sour Review by Justin R
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So far my favorite yogurt! Sets rather fast, and I love the taste! I use 1% milk and add non fat dry milk to thicken it.

(Posted on 4/17/2015)

It doesn't get better than this! Review by Elly
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I am making awesome raw yogurt with my Bulgarian Yogurt Starter from Cultures for Health. I thought it would be cumbersome to use raw milk, but it turned out to be easy, once I had the routine down. And the directions on this site are spot on and easy to follow. I do use 1 tsp. of Great Lakes Gelatin per 4 cups of milk, to enhance the thickness. This is the best!

(Posted on 4/1/2015)

Dissapointing Review by Disapointed
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I followed the instructions to a "T" After 12 hours in Yogurt maker, the yogurt separated into whey and the rest was a mush cottage cheese look. I contacted this company by email to see what to do about it and there was no answer.
The San Francisco Sour Dough Starter was excellent but the yogurt was not.

Response from CFH: We are so sorry you had trouble reaching us. Thanks for your review. Our support staff has sent an email for follow up. Please hang on to your product, as many cultures can be saved with minor adjustments.

(Posted on 3/31/2015)

Did not reculture well Review by Rebecca
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I've been making yogurt for years and was attracted to this because the description claimed that I could reuse it over and over. The first batch turned out beautifully. The second generation of that batch also was perfect. The third generation turned out clumpy and clotted. We're still eating it, because it tastes alright, but I'm quitting after that one. I'll make the other packet and see if there is a difference but I'm very disappointed by this purchase.

CFH Note: It is important to contact Customer Support when you experience problems. It sounds like the culture is working, you're getting a good flavor but there are a few issues that can impact the texture. Make sure that you're making a new batch within 5 to 7 days, don't heat the milk too quickly and test the temperature of your yogurt making method. Reusable yogurt cultures are more sensitive to temperature issues and you need to maintain a consistent temperature between 105° and 112° for the duration of the culturing process.

(Posted on 3/28/2015)

Great Flavor Review by SmokedGouda
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Great Bulgarian flavor. I found that this yogurt is a tiny bit too thin for my liking, but I've tweaked that with longer fermenting times and by holding the milk at 170 degrees (f) for 15 minutes before I cool it down and add starter. This evaporates some of the moisture.

(Posted on 3/26/2015)

my go-to starter Review by merry
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We are new to yogurt-making. I purchased the Bulgarian starter along with the Euro Cuisine yogurt machine, and successfully made a batch of yogurt using grass-fed cows milk. Because we weren't eating it quickly, I put part of it into the freezer, and the next time I made yogurt, my first batch had remained in the freezer longer than suggested to use as starter for the next batch. So, I used the second packet of Bulgarian starter. That batch turned out great, and we used it to make our next batches. The yogurt in the freezer? I used it to replace the buttermilk in the most delicious, tender biscuits I have ever eaten! I'm also using yogurt in pancakes - so tender and delicate! Yum! We are enjoying making healthful yogurt - my husband eats it daily with a teaspoon of fruit spread mixed in. I initially had a bit of sticker shock, but with careful planning, it's possible to make one package be used as culture for yogurt for many, many batches of creamy yogurt! I have since purchased a second box to have on hand in my freezer. CFH has wonderful customer service, and they have very patiently answered my many, many questions about yogurt making. Love it!

(Posted on 3/25/2015)

Sorry I bought it Review by May
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Don't bother to waste your money

Note from CFH: Please contact Customer Support before discarding any cultures. Many cultures can be saved with minor adjustments.

(Posted on 3/24/2015)

Wonderful - delicious!! Review by Kathy
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A lovely creamy yogurt. My college student takes it back with her to keep in her dorm refrigerator. Easy to make with the Yogotherm.

(Posted on 3/24/2015)

Great tasting yogurt!! Review by Chelia
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Working on technique. I have been using my crock-pot, "keep warm" to culture the yogurt. The first two batches were not firm and thick but tasted great. One batch I tried in the oven "keep warm", it didn't set at all. I think because I strained the yogurt and it didn't have the whey or enough of it to culture. Reheated the failed batch to 110 degrees added the whey, put it in the crock-pot and yeah, nice, thick, delicious yogurt. You do need to save some of the yogurt with the whey to re-culture. I do like straining the yogurt to get a nice, thicker yogurt ;)

CFH note: We recommend testing the temperature of your method before activating the starter to avoid issues, especially if you aren't using a yogurt maker. Yogurt starters need a consistent temperature between 105° and 112°.

(Posted on 3/24/2015)

The Real Stuff Review by Bill
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Many, many batches from one packet.

(Posted on 3/23/2015)

First time user Review by LDJJ
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I've made yogurt in the past using store bought yogurt as the starter. And I've had success, but I was never happy with the taste or thickness. I've drained it to make it thicker, but still didn't have the flavor I was looking for.

I purchased the Bulgarian starter after reading the description and reviews. The main thing that drew me to it was that the flavor was reminiscent of European yogurts, which I have had on trips and love.

I actually used 1 cup of half and half (not ultra pasteurized) and 3 cups of whole milk with my batch and absolutely love how it came out. It has the flavor and creaminess that I was looking for.

I did have a bit of a panic moment when I checked it at the 5 hour point and it did not look set at all. I walked away and gave my prayers to the yogurt gods and at 8 hours in was completely set and wonderful. I will be straining some for yogurt cheese and other uses, but I am in love with this yogurt. Thank you so much!

(Posted on 3/22/2015)

Lovely taste Review by Jynae
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This is my second yogurt starter from this site and I love both. The first two batches were runny but since then it's made lovely, smooth yogurt with a nice tart taste.

(Posted on 3/10/2015)

Dependable Review by Michael
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I ordered the Bulgarian culture six weeks ago and make at least 12 quarts of yogurt each week. I always reserve a pint to add to the next batch of one gallon whole milk and one quart of half and half. I remove the pint from the refrigerator and let it warm up on the counter over the dishwasher while washing the Ball jars. The culture does extremely well and is dependable for my twice a week preparation. I prep the quart mason jars with the mixture and let them cozy up in my Brod and Taylor proofing box at 110 degrees for seven hours. I have strained a batch to make Greek style yogurt but found I like a little whey in my yogurt. The culture solidifies well and has just the right amount of tanginess without being overwhelmingly sour. I'm extremely pleased with the finished result which is excellent with frozen blueberries and Splenda sprinkled on top.

(Posted on 3/4/2015)

Great service wonderabout refrigration of product-nothing on box Natto culture was the product. Review by Erwin
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nothing about storing product dark dry place refrigerator?

CFH note: The first bullet item under "Before You Get Started" section includes instructions for storing the backup packet in the freezer. The starter is fine at room temperature for 3 to 4 months but freezer storage maximizes the shelf life (12 mo +).

(Posted on 3/3/2015)

Bulgarian Yogurt starter Review by Christina
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This yogurt turned out wonderful! Super yummy and creamy.

(Posted on 3/2/2015)



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